Care About the Ocean? Think Twice About Your Coffee Lid.

Near Bermuda in the Atlantic Ocean, currents define the Sargasso Sea—the only sea that is not defined by land boundaries. Known by some as a floating rain forest, the Sargasso Sea is named for the free-floating seaweed Sargassum and provides food and shelter for a vast variety of wildlife. However, those same currents carry a huge amount of plastics that eventually break down in the water and are eaten by small fish and other species that are then eaten by larger fish. The toxic chemicals intensify as they move up the food chain through these animals—right onto our plates. This short film by Justin Lewis and Michelle Stauffer is a straightforward look at the impact single-use plastics have on oceans, wildlife, and humans.

Read a Q&A with Lewis and Stauffer.

See more from the filmmakers.

The Short Film Showcase spotlights exceptional short videos created by filmmakers from around the web and selected by National Geographic editors. We look for work that affirms National Geographic's belief in the power of science, exploration, and storytelling to change the world. The filmmakers created the content presented, and the opinions expressed are their own, not those of National Geographic Partners.

Know of a great short film that should be part of our Showcase? Email to submit a video for consideration. See more from National Geographic's Short Film Showcase at

#shortfilmshowcase @natgeo